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This page summarises the key elements of the Conservation Area Appraisal for Holt: 

What is the special interest of Holt?

Historic market town

Holt
  • Holt is and has long been the commercial hub for the surrounding smaller villages.
  • Holt’s grander commercial buildings and larger concentration of public realm features contrast with the smaller vernacular buildings of the surrounding rural area.
  • The historic street pattern with the Market Place and High Street at its heart and radiating, increasingly residential buildings together with alleys and yards typical of Norfolk settlements.
  • The quality of buildings is reflected in the high number of listed buildings.
Holt

A variety of buildings

Holt
  • Shops, banks, and other commercial premises are concentrated in the centre.
  • Educational buildings are an important feature with the Old School House of Gresham’s School and the early twentieth-century Primary School.
  • Churches and chapels add interest and quality to the townscape including the medieval Church of St Andrew, Gothic Revival Methodist Church and Classical Wesleyan Chapel.
Holt

Materials and character

  • One of the most important contributors to the special interest is the concentration of large and stylistically refined Georgian buildings following the losses in the 1708 fire.
  • Red and gault brick are the predominant materials seen in Holt, with some render and painted brick. Red clay and black glazed pantiles bring an element of the local vernacular to the buildings. Flint and timber are found in older buildings.
  • Decorative iron arches are welcoming features which stand at the openings to small alleys.
Holt

Settings and views

  • The churchyard and Gresham’s playing fields form an important green buffer whilst Horn Pits is a pleasant green space area. The fields and woods of Spout Hills and Holt Country Park outside the Conservation Area provide a green setting.
  • The agricultural landscape of the Glaven Valley contrasts with the character of the town and reflects the historical importance of Holt as a market town.
  • Attractive views along the streets.
Holt

Townscape analysis

The following Holt map is available to view as a pdf.

Holt townscape map with key

Conservation philosophy

The Appraisal proposes new local designations for buildings with architectural and historical qualities that add to the local character. These are not formally designated buildings but ones with a degree of significance that merit consideration in planning decisions. They are shown in yellow on the adjacent plan and listed in the Appraisal document in Section 5.3, Section 6 and Appendix C. Changes to the boundary are also proposed and are shown on the plan and listed below. See Section 8.3.8 of the Appraisal for more details.

Holt
Holt
  • The built environment should be well maintained.
  • Nationally and locally designated buildings should be preserved and enhanced.
  • Detracting features should be removed.
  • The sensitive replacement of lost historic features or those which have been replaced with inappropriate alternatives is encouraged.
  • Outbuildings, boundaries, and landscape features which form the setting of individual heritage assets should be preserved and enhanced.
  • The scale, massing, density of buildings and materiality of existing buildings in the Conservation Area should be preserved.
  • A built environment will be maintained in which the buildings are almost all of two or three storeys in height in the centre, with smaller scale buildings on the peripheral streets.
  • The town will be managed to maintain the existing contrast in the density of buildings predominately in commercial use in the core, with more spread out and mainly residential development further away from the centre.
  • The bustling market town character of Holt should be preserved.
  • Improvements to shop fronts and shop signage should continue, with the replacement of inappropriate fascia and shop fronts with ones of a more traditional design in keeping with the Conservation Area's character.
  • Solutions for new car parks within Holt should be investigated as a priority with any new cark park being sensitively located.
Holt
  • Whilst Holt, as a Principal Settlement, must accommodate new residential and commercial development, any new development, whether attached to an existing building or detached in its plot, must be appropriate in terms of scale, massing, design, and materials.
  • The important green spaces within and within the Conservation Area setting, particularly the playing fields, Spout Hills and the Horn Pits, and views across these spaces will be preserved.
  • New development should be high quality and appropriate in terms of scale, massing, design, and materials, and should be the minimum necessary to meet housing demands.
  • Landscaping should be appropriate to the character of the Conservation Area, and mature trees should be retained.
  • Views should be protected.
Holt

Proposed locally listed buildings and boundary changes 

The Appraisal proposes new local designations for buildings with architectural and historical qualities that add to the local character. These are not formally designated buildings but ones with a degree of significance that merit consideration in planning decisions. They are shown in yellow on the adjacent plan and listed in the Appraisal document in Section 5.3, Section 6 and Appendix C. Changes to the boundary are also proposed and are shown on the plan and listed below. See Section 8.3.8 of the Appraisal for more details.

The boundary has been reviewed, and proposed changes are detailed below. Several small changes are proposed to the boundary in Holt.

  1. B, C There are a few late-twentieth/early-twenty-first century housing developments located in infill plots behind the main historic streets or on the peripheries of the market town which have no particular architectural or historic interest. These are proposed for exclusion from the boundary to ensure areas within the boundary suitable meet the designation criteria.
  1. The boundary cuts through the centre of a modern house and plot. The boundary is proposed for redrawing around the plot's edge to exclude this modern house of no historic interest.
  2. Exclude the modern northern range of the supermarket, which is already excluded from the boundary.
  3. Exclude the remainder of the supermarket car park. The inclusion of this part of the car park appears to be an anomaly. The historic wall on the north side of the car park remains within the Conservation Area boundary.
  4. Exclude the Chapel Street car park, similarly to the Budgens car park's exclusion, which does not contain any heritage interest. The basic modern public WCs are also proposed for removal from the boundary.
  5. A house dating from the early-twentieth-century, first built in the field to the east of the Horn Pits. It is an attractive house with castellated porch and good quality timber sash windows.
  6. Four late-Victorian/Edwardian cottages in a terrace with many original features. All but one retain timber sash windows, and the eastern pair remain un-rendered to reveal brick and flint walls. The bay windows and veranda are attractive features, and these are better preserved examples than some of those on Peacock Lane which are currently included within the boundary.

The Former Police Station, No. 32a Station Road, is proposed for local listing as it has a special architectural and historical interest.

The following Holt map is available to view as a pdf.

Holt boundary review

Last updated: 5th February 2021