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Date published: 16th March 2016

Kings Lynn magistrates’ court this week (Wednesday March 9) fined a company and its director £25,000 for felling two trees.

 The 40ft-tall lime trees on a development site in Fakenham were protected by a Tree Preservation Order. The felling of the trees by Bobyk Developments Limited and Jody Bobyk took place after Mr Bobyk was told by North Norfolk District Council that they would not be given permission to cut the trees down for better construction access to his building site.

 Cabinet member for Planning and Planning Policy Cllr Sue Arnold: “This is an excellent result. This ruling sends a message to all developers that they cannot ignore conditions of planning permission and Tree Preservation Orders. TPOs are put in place to prevent the deliberate damage or destruction of trees with considerable public value, whether a single tree, group or woodland. Those who wilfully disregard these orders face significant fines and we hope today’s decision will make people see how seriously a breach of these orders is taken by the courts.

 

Link for image: https://www.north-norfolk.gov.uk/media/1002/signature-refresh.jpg 

 The magistrates said that developers were subject to the planning laws and that in this case there had been a disregard totally for those laws, and that they had been told by the District Council the trees should not be cut down.

 Bobyk Developments Ltd and director Jody Bobyk pleaded guilty to all charges. The company was fined £10,000 per tree for causing the trees to be cut down contrary to a Tree Preservation Order, £2,423 prosecution costs, and £1,000 victim surcharge. Jody Bobyk was fined £2,500 per tree as a director for consenting to causing the trees to be cut down. He was ordered to pay £1,211.50 prosecution costs and £250 victim surcharge. The full total coming to £29,884.50.


Last updated: 13th October 2017